From Scalia's Tears to Ruth Bader Gin & Juice to the Pride Cocktail Tree.

What is the taste of Justice Antonin Scalia’s tears? Well, at Chicago’s Geek Bar at least, they’re salty, acidic, and as bitter as biting into a pile of rodenticide.

That’s if you’re drinking “Scalia’s Tears,” a cocktail the bar whipped up to commemorate Friday’s Supreme Court ruling legalizing gay marriage. The recipe incorporates the orange liqueur Combier, apple bitters, salt, and Malört—that wormwood-infused, face-puckering drink that one critic likens to “earwax, fire, poison, and decaying flesh.”

It’s a fittingly harsh tribute to a man who, despite professing that the case’s outcome was “not of immense personal importance to me,” sounded pretty acerbic in his dissent. On Friday and through the weekend, bars all around the country were serving up similarly SCOTUS-themed drinks. Even Starbucks got in on the party, to believe this customer’s photo:

http://iwasalonelyrobot.tumblr.com/post/122525645181/coffeepotsmokin-viewtiful-jay-had-a-special

In Washington, D.C., you could get the “Ruth Bader Gin & Juice” at The Jefferson hotel:

Alchemy Memphis mixed up something called the “Marie Antoinette Scalia,” a combination of gin, passion fruit, Pimm’s, champagne, and “beverage equality”:

D.C.’s One Eight Distilling outed the long-rumored couple “Bert & Ernie” with a gin/lavender concoction:

Also in D.C., Duplex Diner joined the fun with a SCOTUS special:

The wine bar Spoke in Somerville, Massachusetts, crafted the “All Parts Equal,” which looks like you’d need 10 mouth parts to imbibe:

Another convoluted offering came from New York’s Sushi Samba in the form of the “Pride Cocktail Tree”:

Parish in Atlanta made this refreshing cucumber-gin drink, the “All Things Equal”:

What’s the best food to pair with these libations? It’d be hard to go wrong with the rainbow-flag slice from Vinnie's Pizzeria in Brooklyn:

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