Mayor Ras Baraka’s journey from impressionable child to the seat of power in a wounded American city.

During the Great Migration, six million African Americans moved from the rural South to urban areas in the North, Midwest and West—among them was Coyt Jones, father of Amiri Baraka and grandfather of Newark Mayor Ras Baraka. This short documentary juxtaposes Ras Baraka’s experience growing up in Newark with his grandfather’s memories of migrating from the Deep South, and touches on the racial tensions in Newark that have yet to heal. "Newark is still in its infancy after all of these years, we still are wearing the scars of the rebellion," Baraka says of the 1967 riots that left 26 dead and hundreds injured.

This film appears in the inaugural issue of Newest Americans, a collaboration between Rutgers University-Newark, Talking Eyes, and VII Photo centered around America's changing demographics. More information can be found on the Facebook page and Twitter account.

Additional credits: produced by Julie Winokur and Katharine Garrison, photography by Ashley Gilbertson, cinematography by Ed Kashi and Julie Winokur, executive produced by Tim Raphael.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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