From L.A. to New York to Mexico, people love beating the stuffing out of the GOP candidate.

A video posted by Michelle (@anatomical_lily) on

Ever want to smack Donald Trump with a hard object?

If so, you’re not alone. Lots of people would enjoy beating the tar out of the insufferable GOP candidate, to judge from the glorious rise of the Donald Trump piñata.

The real-estate mogul might not be polling so well among Latinos, but his punchability ratings are off the chart. Children and adults alike are thrashing his papier-mâché likeness at parties and cookouts from Dallas to L.A. to New York. In Mexico they’re hawking them on the streets—though as one buyer jokes in the below video, “He needs a better combover for $15.”

The piñatas are so popular in San Francisco’s Mission District they’re selling out, most likely due to Trump’s bloviations on immigration. Reports ABC News:

Carolina Nolasco, of San Francisco, says Trumps’ statements have been deeply offensive to hard working immigrants like herself.

Discount City says they’re selling better than expected—up to 30 a day. Orders have been made to stock up.

The piñatas are available in two sizes and being sold starting at $20 for the small size.

As to what people are filling the dolls with, the best guess says breath mints and wig glue. Have a look at some of the maimable mini-Dons popping up across the land, beginning with Chula Vista, California:

Los Angeles:

San Francisco:

A photo posted by rv832 (@rv832) on

A photo posted by dreamer (@dreamer_sf) on

Brooklyn:

Austin:

A photo posted by Bob Suren (@bobsurenwriter) on

A photo posted by @stevehopson on

Mexico:

A video posted by Gina Loudon (@drginaloudon) on

A photo posted by Discover Baja (@discoverbaja) on

Santa Cruz:

A photo posted by Jessica York (@reporterjess) on

Locations unknown:

A photo posted by John Serpe (@johnny.serp) on

A photo posted by Dying2livex (@khaleesiiii89) on

San Diego:

A photo posted by Noelia Mendez (@pinatasbiz) on

Dallas:

A photo posted by Paul Muniz (@pmuniz123) on

A photo posted by MsElenius Baca (@mselenius) on

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  2. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  3. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  4. a photo of San Francisco tourists posing before the city's iconic skyline.
    Life

    Cities Don’t Have Souls. Why Do We Battle For Them?

    What do we mean when we say that the “soul of the city” is under threat? Often, it’s really about politics, nostalgia, and the fear of community change.

  5. A new map of neighborhood change in U.S. metros shows where displacement is the main problem, and where economic decline persists.
    Equity

    From Gentrification to Decline: How Neighborhoods Really Change

    A new report and accompanying map finds extreme gentrification in a few cities, but the dominant trend—particularly in the suburbs—is the concentration of low-income population.