Riccardo Schirinz

An Italian Instagrammer creates fantasy out of reality.

Italian Instagrammer Riccardo Schirinzi, much like the man in the photo above, walks around with his head in the clouds.

Well, almost. The first step in Schirinzi’s process is to take a walk down the street and photograph anything that grabs his attention: passers-by, urban landscapes, and inanimate objects. He then blends these images together, sometimes incorporating public domain stock photos, until he’s created strange and surreal images that he calls the product of “epiphany.”

”Most of my fun comes out when I play with paradoxes,” he writes via email. “When I mix up real environments together with unreal interference (like shapes, people, objects).”

Schirinzi’s Instragrams (posted under the handle charlie_davoli) are inspired by the work of surreal Italian artist Giorgio de Chirico, pop artists Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol, and geometry-obsessed artists, designers, and architects of the Bauhaus era, he tells Instagram’s blog. But unlike those predecessors, the only tool Schirinzi requires for his creations—from start to finish—is his iPhone.

Check out some of his dream-like mash-ups below:

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