The “Mobile Cyclorama” app pays digital homage to the art of panoramas.

The mystery of what lies beyond the frame of a painting is arguably what makes its content so exciting. But artists have long tried to transcend the boundaries of the medium. Eighteenth-century English artist Robert Barker, for example, painted “cycloramas”—huge panoramas of London on cylindrical surfaces.

Mexican artist Raúl Moyado Sandoval has now created an app using Google Maps technology that brings cycloramas into the 21st century. With “Mobile Cyclorama,” users can virtually walk around his paintings of streets and landscapes, just the way they experience streets in far-off places on Google Street View.

Take this quiet street scene. You can turn around toward the source of the light and find that it’s a street lamp:

Or you could look up at the sky…

Essentially the app enables you to step inside his imagination and take a tour. “Google Street View is making a record of the world through the medium of photography,” Sandoval told Mexico's National Council for Culture and the Arts in an interview in Spanish. “I'm making a record of my inner world through painting.”

Check Sandoval’s other Google Street View paintings here.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    The ‘Marie Kondo Effect’ Comes at a Weird Time for Thrift Stores

    Netflix’s hit show has everyone tidying up, but that's not the only reason second-hand stores are being flooded with donations.

  2. A man carrying a young boy on his shoulders amid the fall foliage of New York's Central Park.
    Life

    Which U.S. Cities Have the Most Families With Kids?

    Spoiler alert: It’s simply not the case that families with kids have disappeared from urban America.

  3. A photo of President Donald Trump showing off U.S.-Mexico border wall prototypes in March 2018.
    Perspective

    This Isn't a Border Wall: It's a Monument to White Supremacy

    Like Confederate monuments, President Trump’s vision of a massive wall along the Mexican border is about propaganda and racial oppression, not national security.

  4. A photo of a DART light rail train in Dallas, Texas.
    Transportation

    What Cities Are Getting Wrong About Public Transportation

    Cities could get more people walking, biking, and riding transit, according to a new report, if they just know where to look for improvement.

  5. A woman, forced into the street by blocked sidewalks, pushes a stroller down a street in Boston.
    Perspective

    Why Cities, Not Individuals, Should Clear Snow From Sidewalks

    Most U.S. cities leave the responsibility of sidewalk snow removal to homeowners, landlords, and businesses. The result: endangered pedestrians.