The “Mobile Cyclorama” app pays digital homage to the art of panoramas.

The mystery of what lies beyond the frame of a painting is arguably what makes its content so exciting. But artists have long tried to transcend the boundaries of the medium. Eighteenth-century English artist Robert Barker, for example, painted “cycloramas”—huge panoramas of London on cylindrical surfaces.

Mexican artist Raúl Moyado Sandoval has now created an app using Google Maps technology that brings cycloramas into the 21st century. With “Mobile Cyclorama,” users can virtually walk around his paintings of streets and landscapes, just the way they experience streets in far-off places on Google Street View.

Take this quiet street scene. You can turn around toward the source of the light and find that it’s a street lamp:

Or you could look up at the sky…

Essentially the app enables you to step inside his imagination and take a tour. “Google Street View is making a record of the world through the medium of photography,” Sandoval told Mexico's National Council for Culture and the Arts in an interview in Spanish. “I'm making a record of my inner world through painting.”

Check Sandoval’s other Google Street View paintings here.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    Why Asian Countries Have Succeeded in Flattening the Curve

    To help flatten the curve in the Covid-19 outbreak, officials at all levels of government are asking people to stay home. Here's what’s worked, and what hasn't.

  2. photo: South Korean soldiers attempt to disinfect the sidewalks of Seoul's Gagnam district in response to the spread of COVID-19.
    Coronavirus

    Pandemics Are Also an Urban Planning Problem

    Will COVID-19 change how cities are designed? Michele Acuto of the Connected Cities Lab talks about density, urbanization and pandemic preparation.  

  3. photo: a bicycle rider wearing a mask in London
    Coronavirus

    In a Global Health Emergency, the Bicycle Shines

    As the coronavirus crisis forces changes in transportation, some cities are building bike lanes and protecting cycling shops. Here’s why that makes sense.

  4. Equity

    The Problem With a Coronavirus Rent Strike

    Because of coronavirus, millions of tenants won’t be able to write rent checks. But calls for a rent holiday often ignore the longer-term economic effects.

  5. photo: a For Rent sign in a window in San Francisco.
    Coronavirus

    Do Landlords Deserve a Coronavirus Bailout, Too?

    Some renters and homeowners are getting financial assistance during the economic disruption from the coronavirus pandemic. What about landlords?

×