Meet the realty company that buys houses from struggling homeowners in one of America's first mass-produced suburbs.

Levittown, Pennsylvania became famous in the 1950s for being one of America's first mass-produced suburbs in the post-World War II era. Today, the neighborhoods may no longer be carbon copies of each other, but the allure and the difficulties of homeownership remain real. In this documentary produced by Katherine Wells for The Atlantic's American Dreams series, we get a snapshot of a realty company that buys Levittown homes from struggling homeowners. "Your home, for most people, is your biggest asset and it's where your heart is tied to," says Andrea, the property acquisition manager. "What I say to people is that [selling a home] is not the end. Take your memories with you, and it could be the beginning of another American dream."

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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