Totes McGoats to the rescue!

Niagara Falls, New York, has a plan to increase recycling. And part of that plan includes a man-goat in a custom graphic tee.

Totes McGoats has been appointed as mascot for the Niagara Falls Solid Waste Education and Enforcement Team, also known as SWEET. The demon creature was introduced at a press conference Tuesday by mayor Paul Dyster, who referred to McGoats as “a cute animal mascot, kind of scary actually.”

Totes will totes visit local schools to intimidate encourage kids to use their recycling totes (or bins) at home. Niagara Falls is in a position to try just about anything to increase re-use and recycling: It had a shockingly poor recycling rate of 4 percent as of 2014, according to an Investigate Post report.

Dyster told the Investigative Post last year that he wanted to reduce garbage collections by 10 percent and increase the recycling rate to 20 percent, potentially saving the city $550,000 a year.

Launched earlier this year, the city’s new program provides 64-gallon garbage bins and 96-gallon recycling bins, and makes it illegal to leave torn trash bags, large bulk items, and other waste outside them.

At Tuesday’s press conference, the mayor announced that the city’s recycling rate is now at 23 percent. "We've had a dramatic increase in recycling in the city of Niagara Falls since the program was instituted,” Dyster said.

And a demonic-looking half-man-half-goat can only help things get even better.

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