A playful approach to London’s horrifying real estate prices.

The first thing you need to know is that the United Kingdom has its very own Monopoly board. While the classic game lets Americans loose in New Jersey’s Atlantic City, British real estate hounds can buy up properties in one of the most expensive cities in the world: London, England.

Since 1935, when the Parker Brothers first licensed the creation of a U.K. Monopoly board, London has gotten even more expensive. Exactly how mind-bendingly pricey? That’s the question explored by a new game board by the international roommate-finding website Weroom, which helps users track down “flatshares” in a number of British, French, Belgian and German cities.

Get ready to be depressed:

(Courtesy Weroom)

Yes, that’s right. The Monopoly price for a room on Euston Road is worth four days of rent today. A month is going to set you back £821, more than 8 times the original Monopoly price. The £60 that scores the carefree Monopoly player a property at Whitechapel Road would translate to just 45 hours and 36 minutes of real-life shelter in 2015.  

CityLab’s own Feargus O’Sullivan has written that London is in the midst of an unprecedented moment of affordable housing activism. The movement has actually seen some (limited) results: Last year, protestors forced U.S. investors to nix their plan to evict families from an east London development. Still, the city’s housing market bears the marks of what a New York Times op-ed callsan exploitative rat race.”

The good news is that Londoners who wish for a moment’s reprieve have an exciting prospective distraction: Monopoly. The original version.

H/t: Londonist

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    Who’s Really Buying Property in San Francisco?

    A lot of software developers, according to an unprecedented new analysis.

  2. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  3. a photo of a man surveying a home garage.
    Transportation

    How Single-Family Garages Can Ease California's Housing Crisis

    Given the affordable housing crisis, California cities should encourage single-family homeowners to convert garages into apartments and accessory dwelling units.

  4. Design rendering of a high-tech floating city.
    Environment

    Floating Cities Aren’t the Answer to Climate Change

    UN-Habitat is looking at high-tech urban islands as a potential survival fix for communities at risk from rising seas. This isn’t what resilience looks like.

  5. Environment

    No, Puerto Rico’s New Climate-Change Law Is Not a ‘Green New Deal’

    Puerto Rico just adopted legislation that commits it to generating all its power from renewable sources. Here’s what separates that from what’s going on in D.C.