Mic Smith/AP

Michael Nutter said the city doesn’t have “any room for that kind of stupidity.”

No, mayors can’t ban Donald Trump from coming to their cities. Not even the mayor of Philadelphia.

Still, Mayor Michael Nutter is the latest local leader to tell the world that Trump shouldn’t expect a welcome reception in his or her city any time soon. According to the Associated Press, Mayor Nutter said that Philly doesn’t have “any room for that kind of stupidity.”

Nutter isn’t alone in wanting to ban Trump. Rick Kriseman, mayor of
St. Petersburg, Florida, got the ball rolling by announcing that he was banning Donald Trump from St. Pete, shortly after Trump suggested he’d ban Muslims from the U.S. if elected president. More than 400,000 people have signed a petition to ban Trump from the U.K., a notion that the House of Commons now has to consider officially. After Trump said that British Muslims were making a menace out of neighborhoods in London and Paris, London Mayor Boris Johnson said, “The only reason I wouldn't go to some parts of New York is the real risk of meeting Donald Trump.”

John Fetterman, the mayor of Braddock, Pennsylvania, put it even more succinctly. He released a five-word statement: “Donald Trump is a jagoff.” (For those readers who don’t speak Pittsburghese, CityLab has you covered.)

If Nutter really wants to stick it to Trump, he can put his money where his mouth is. Right now, Philadelphia is considering rolling back its status as a “sanctuary city,” meaning that Philadelphia would comply with federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents on orders to detain immigrant suspects who would otherwise be released pending trial. Nutter himself signed the executive order declaring Philadelphia a sanctuary city in April 2014. To give in to congressional Republicans who have targeted the city ever since would be to accept the nativist values embodied by Trump and much of the GOP. Philly doesn’t have any room for that kind of stupidity, either.

Philadelphia Mayor-elect Jim Kenney agrees with pro-immigrant groups who have criticized the practice of so-called “ICE holds.” He will have to decide whether Philadelphia can afford the funds that Republicans are freezing in order to force the issue. It’s one thing to simply say that Trump has no place in Philly; it’s another to prove that immigrants do.

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