Pobel and The Dream

A street artist accomplished the defacement using a cleverly altered pizza box.

In 2007, Donald Trump got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame allegedly for The Apprentice, though the local chamber of commerce also cites his “extravagant lifestyle and outspoken manner” and “much publicized financial problems, creditor-led bailout, extramarital affair with Marla Maples, and the resulting divorce from his first wife, Ivana Trump.”

The star is now making headlines thanks to a story at Rimmed claiming it could be removed due to “people peeing on it, dogs peeing on it, and even humans pooping on it.” Snopes has debunked reports of human defecation and a possible removal, though it is true people keep attacking it with graffiti—scrawling “don’t vote” above his name, for instance, or adding a swastika (“people aren't sure whether it was a supporter or a protester,” writes a Twitter egg).

One of the more creative defacements recently occurred when a black “mute” symbol appeared on the star, presumably asking if there’s any way to make the candidate shut up. Thanks to video that surfaced over the weekend, we now know the vandal behind the muting is Norway’s Pobel, who accomplished the trick using a stencil cut into a pizza box (while wearing a Trump mask, no less). Here’s how the lightning-quick operation went down:

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