“It’s incredibly strong. It will last practically forever.”

Living inside a passenger jet sounds like some special circle of hell, but Bruce Campbell makes it look pretty cozy, as a video by Great Big Story documents.

Campbell, an electrical engineer, spends his days in a Boeing 727 that functioned as a Greek airliner in the 1960s. He purchased the retired aircraft in 1999, and keeps it parked in a forest clearing near Portland, Oregon. Over the decades, Campbell has gradually renovated the plane to make it into a kind of spacious studio apartment, recycling original parts and finding homey potential in the plane’s once-rigid spaces. The wings serve as a deck. The cockpit is a reading room. The lavatories, well, those are still lavatories. Campbell continues to restore and refine his home, according to his personal site, airplanehome.com.

Nutty? Sure. But there’s unmistakable wisdom in Campbell’s project.

“It’s a sealed pressure canister. It’s incredibly strong,” he says in the video. “It will last practically forever.”

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a wallet full of Yen bills.
    Life

    Japan’s Lost-and-Found System Is Insanely Good

    If you misplace your phone or wallet in Tokyo, chances are very good that you’ll get it back. Here’s why.

  2. Design

    How We Map Epidemics

    Cartographers are mapping the coronavirus in more sophisticated ways than past epidemics. But visualizing outbreaks dates back to cholera and yellow fever.

  3. photo: Masdar City in Abu Dhabi
    Environment

    What Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future Looks Like Now

    At the UN’s World Urban Forum in Abu Dhabi, attendees toured Masdar City, the master-planned eco-complex designed to show off the UAE’s commitment to sustainability.

  4. photo: An elderly resident of a village in Japan's Gunma Prefecture.
    Life

    In Japan’s Vanishing Rural Towns, Newcomers Are Wanted

    Facing declining birthrates and rural depopulation, hundreds of “marginal villages” could vanish in a few decades. But some small towns are fighting back.

  5. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

×