A documentary profiles residents who scavenge for metals and plastics.

The documentary Dogtown Redemption profiles a recycling center in West Oakland, California, where homeless survive by scavenging metals and plastics for very little money. Filmed over the course of seven years, the film follows four characters as they deal with the changing neighborhood—where many residents view the center as a noisy nuisance that attracts scavengers, drug dealers, and criminals. This is a short excerpt from the film. You can stream Dogtown Redemption online until August 15, 2016.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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