These just-born brothers will face unique challenges living on the edge of urban and wild.

CityLab takes its responsibility to share urban wildlife news very seriously, especially when the news is cute as heck. And for that, we are very grateful to the National Park Service’s Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, which just released footage of their scientists working with two baby bobcat brothers, born earlier this spring. An NPS ranger writes on Facebook:

Meet B-340 and B-341, residents of the central Santa Monica Mountains. We found the brothers in a commandeered woodrat nest, took samples and measurements, placed ear tags, returned them, and set up a camera trap to monitor for mom's return. They eventually moved elsewhere, making room for someone else to return (watch the video to find out who!).

The vast, rugged chain of parklands that cuts through greater Los Angeles is home to a charismatic array of coyotes, mountain lions, bobcats, and many other smaller animals who face unique challenges living on the edge of urban and wild. In an effort to understand their diets and behavior, and to protect wildlife habitats, a host of scientists track and study these animals using traps, cameras, and GPS collars. NPS biologist Joanne Moriarty found these adorable bobcat babies by following GPS signals from their mom’s collar. "It was sort of like finding a needle in a haystack," Moriarty told LAist.

LAist also points out that cat videos have “more views-per-video than any other category of YouTube content.” You’re welcome.

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