People leave bouquets of flowers in tribute to the victims in Nice, France. Pascal Rossignol/Reuters

At least 84 are dead after the driver of a truck drove into crowds at the annual Bastille Day celebrations in the southern French city.

At least 84 people are dead and dozens more injured in what Christian Estrosi, the former mayor of Nice, France, and current president of the Alpes-Maritimes region, has described as a "terrible attack" during a Bastille Day celebration on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice.

The attack took place late Thursday evening as a crowd had gathered to watch fireworks in celebration of the national holiday. The driver of a large truck drove on to the sidewalk and plowed through the crowd, continuing on a path of carnage for 1.1 miles.  The Associated Press is quoting local officials who say the truck was loaded with arms and grenades, and that the driver was killed by police.

More from the AP:

Video footage showed men and women — one or two pushing strollers — racing to get away from the scenes. And, in what appeared to be evidence of a gun battle, photos showed a truck with at least half a dozen bullet holes punched through its windshield.

The Nice-Matin newspaper is reporting that police have identified a 31-year-old French-born Tunisian who lived in the Nice area as the attacker, and that authorities have raided the man’s home in Nice.

President Francois Hollande has called the attack a “criminal act” and has extended France’s state of emergency for three months. The president had just announced on Thursday, before the attack, that it would finally be lifted July 26 for the first time since the November terrorist attacks in Paris.

Investigators continued to work at the scene Friday near the heavy truck used to run into a crowd at high speed, killing dozens, on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France. (Eric Gaillard/Reuters)

Our colleagues at The Atlantic remind us that this isn't the first time someone has driven into a crowd in France: “There were at least two such events in 2014—one in Nantes and the other in Dijon. Those incidents occurred within days of each other in December of that year and injured several people.”

This story is developing and this post will be updated as more details become available.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Aerial view of narrow strips of land divided by water, some with houses on them.
    Environment

    The Dutch Can’t Save Us From Rising Seas

    Dutch engineers are renowned for their ability to keep cities dry. But their approach doesn’t necessarily translate to an American context.

  2. Equity

    Why Are So Many People In San Jose Fighting Housing for Teachers?

    The school system’s plan to build affordable apartment units for the city’s teachers has triggered a fierce backlash in one affluent area.

  3. Slogan projected on the Eiffel Tower for World Climate Change Conference
    Environment

    What Local Climate Actions Would Have the Greatest Impact

    In light of even more dire news about our warming planet, leading thinkers tell us the one thing cities and states could do to cut emissions significantly—and fast.

  4. Life

    How Manhattan Became a Rich Ghost Town

    New York’s empty storefronts are a dark omen for the future of cities.

  5. The interior of Grand Central Station
    Design

    Saving Grand Central, 40 Years Later: a Cautionary Tale

    The Supreme Court ruling that rescued the icon also opened the door for other, more controversial preservation cases.