Jeff Baenen / AP

Police pulled Philando Castile over for a broken taillight in a suburb of St. Paul, and shot him dead as his girlfriend sat beside him.

Police in Minnesota shot and killed a black man Wednesday night who had been pulled over for a broken taillight, the aftermath of which was live-streamed by his girlfriend who sat in the passenger seat beside him .

The man was pulled over in a suburb of St. Paul around 9 p.m., by an officer with the St. Anthony Police Department. The video shows the man’s car stopped along the road, him leaning back in his seat, his white shirt covered in blood. Beside him a woman who says she’s his girlfriend calmly narrates what happened, while a frantic officer stands outside the driver’s-side window with his gun drawn, yelling, “I told him not to reach for it! I told him to get his hands up!”

The man was identified by friends as Philando Castile, a 32-year-old cafeteria supervisor at a local Montessori school.

As The Minneapolis Star Tribune reported, the woman said just before Castile was shot:

… the officer “asked him for license and registration. He told him that it was in his wallet, but he had a pistol on him because he’s licensed to carry. The officer said don’t move. As he was putting his hands back up, the officer shot him in the arm four or five times.”

Castile was taken to a local medical center, where he later died.

Around midnight, a small protest started at the scene where Castile was shot, and by 2 a.m. it had moved to the governor’s residence, the Star Tribune reported. About 100 people stood outside the gates, shouting Castile’s name, as well as that of Jamar Clark, an unarmed black man killed in November by Minneapolis police.

This story originally appeared on The Atlantic.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo-illustration of several big-box retail stores.
    Equity

    After the Retail Apocalypse, Prepare for the Property Tax Meltdown

    Big-box retailers nationwide are slashing their property taxes through a legal loophole known as "dark store theory." For the towns that rely on that revenue, this could be a disaster.

  2. Equity

    Housing Can’t Be Both Affordable and a Good Investment

    The two pillars of American housing policy are fundamentally at odds.

  3. A man wears a mask with the likeness of French president Emmanuel Macron as people take part in the nationwide "Yellow Vest" demonstrations, a symbol of a French drivers' protest against higher fuel prices, in Haulchin, France.
    Equity

    Why Drivers Are Leading a Protest Movement Across France

    The rapidly developing “Yellow Vest” movement took over streets and highways to oppose rising gas and diesel taxes. It might also be a proxy for frustrations about rising costs and falling living standards.

  4. A photo of protesters carrying anti-Amazon posters during a rally and press conference in NYC.
    Amazon HQ2

    Amazon’s HQ2 Decision Was Always About Transit

    In the end, New York’s MTA and D.C.’s Metro were the only transportation networks capable of handling such an influx of new residents. But both cities will have some work to do.

  5. Rendering of a 65-story glass skyscraper in Quebec City seen at night.
    Design

    The Skyscraper Dividing Quebec City

    Le Phare would stand 65-stories high in Sainte-Foy, an old, low-lying suburb of the historic city.