WSYX/AP

The department said an officer shot and killed a 13-year-old who pulled a weapon—later determined to be a BB gun—from his waistband.

Police in Columbus, Ohio, responding to a report of a robbery, shot and killed a 13-year-old suspect they say “pulled a gun from his waistband.” The weapon was later found to be a BB gun with an attached laser site.

The 13-year-old was later identified as Tyree King. The officer who shot him is a nine-year veteran on the force, WCMH, the local NBC affiliate, reported Thursday. The officer has not yet been named. Under the department’s policy, the officer will receive mandated psychological support counseling and given time off.

At a news conference Thursday morning, Andrew Ginther, the Columbus mayor, said King’s death was “troubling,” calling it a “call to action for our entire community.” He called King’s possession of a “replica of a firearm” “very, very dangerous conduct.” Ginther said the investigation would take time and urged patience, and added: “It is a dangerous time to be a police officer in this country. It is our job to protect them as well as the people they protect.”

King’s death is likely to once against raise scrutiny of how police respond to reports of crimes, as it comes just two years after 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was holding a pellet gun, was shot and killed by police in nearby Cleveland. Indeed, several high-profile killings of black boys and men by police beginning with Michael Brown in 2014 and continuing over the years (most recently with the killings of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling), have resulted in U.S. Justice Department investigations into the police departments in Baltimore, Cleveland, and Ferguson, Missouri. As my colleague David A. Graham previously reported in the wake of the Justice Department’s findings last month in Baltimore:

The Baltimore report fills out a trifecta alongside similar documents from Cleveland and Ferguson. In each case, the Justice Department was brought in following the death of a black man at the hands of police that had resulted in outraged demonstrations in the streets: in Cleveland, Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams (though the shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice shortly before the Justice Department announced its findings overshadowed that case); in Ferguson, Michael Brown; and in Baltimore, Freddie Gray. In each of those cases, criminal prosecutions did not result in convictions, and, in fact, only the Gray case resulted in charges.

The Columbus  Division of Police said King’s shooting will be investigated by the department’s Critical Incident Response Team, and its findings will be reviewed by the department’s top brass.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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