Joshua Roberts/Reuters

We’ll be updating this page over the coming weeks and months as you continue to tell us what you want us to report on.

Since the election of Donald Trump as the next president of the United States, CityLab readers have tons of questions—and we’ve been doing our best to answer them. Throughout the transition, we’ll be updating this page with your most pressing questions, alongside links to our relevant reporting on those subjects.

Have a question you’d like us to answer? Hit us up on Facebook or Twitter, down in the comments, or via email.

Infrastructure and public transportation

Quite a few readers have asked us about what might be coming in terms of infrastructure investment under the new administration, and what effect the election might have on funding for public transportation.

Click through below for our latest stories on the big questions surrounding U.S. infrastructure and transportation policy:

Of course, there are questions we haven’t been able to answer yet, like this one from reader “Some Guy.”

And below are some of the reader questions we’re currently considering as we continue to report on the future of U.S. transportation and infrastructure policy.

  • Matt, Twitter: “How will funding for bicycle infrastructure change?”
  • Rachael, Twitter: What does the “lockbox amendment” in Illinois mean for public transit, biking, and pedestrians?
  • Anna, Twitter: “How do we encourage transit use?”

Fair and affordable housing

“What impact do you think a Trump presidency will have on affordable housing and homelessness?” Rachel asked us. She wasn’t the only one concerned.

Below are our latest stories on fair and affordable housing, but stay tuned for more:

Climate change and the environment

Since the announcement of Trump’s pick of a climate change skeptic to lead the Environmental Protection Agency transition, many readers have told us they are worried about the future of U.S. policy on the environment. “What will the role of the EPA be under Trump?” Azza asked us on Facebook.

More of your questions:

  • Benjamin, Facebook: “How will the National Park Service and public green space and land use be impacted?”
  • “BeaGoode,” Twitter: Trump has said he wants to de-regulate industry. “What does that mean for health of people and the planet?”
  • Ilhab, Facebook: “Will there be adequate federal funding incentives for developing environmentally-friendlier and environmentally equitable cities? If not, are any cities successfully incentivizing with *alternative* funding structures?”

As in this last question, some of you wondered if the environment might become a point of tension between cities and the federal government. “It seems incredibly likely that states and cities will be forced to take the lead on all environmental matters,” James wrote to us on Facebook. “How do you expect to see cities react? To what degree will existing state or local regulations be transformed or negatively impacted by changes to federal policy?”

What we’ve published so far (and there’s more to come):

America divided… and united

A lot of readers are wondering about the deepening urban-rural political split in the U.S. and how it could affect future policy. What sort of power will cities and city officials continue to have?

I'd love to read about how cities are becoming a ‘different’ part of their countries and the challenges that implies,” Diego wrote on our Facebook page.

Of course, not all American cities are the same. Reader Paula is hoping that we’ll emphasize coverage of smaller cities in the coming months. “I'd like to hear about what's happening in Kansas City, Omaha, Des Moines, Milwaukee, Louisville, Cleveland, [or] Pittsburgh,” Paula wrote, even if there’s no “’can you believe this awesome thing is happening in this place?’” story.

Here’s what we’ve published on these subjects so far, but stay tuned for plenty more:

Other questions from readers on this topic:

  • Andre, Facebook: Could cities be independent legislative entities?
  • Jessica, Facebook: “If there is truth in the notion that politics are polarizing more and more along urban-vs.-rural divide,” how has federal investment (or disinvestment) “contributed to the revival of the urban core?”

But it’s early yet. As Andrew tweeted at us: “It honestly feels like we're in a holding pattern until more policy is announced, agreed?”

He’s very right, and as January 20 approaches, we’ll be watching—and listening. If anything we publish in the coming weeks and months raises new questions for you, please let us know, whether in the comments to this piece, via our Facebook or Twitter, or in an email.

Some questions have been edited for clarity and conciseness.

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