A documentary filmed over the course of 20 years tells the story of a disenfranchised community pushed out of their homes.

70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green is a new documentary by America ReFramed that was filmed over the course of 20 years. It tells the story of Cabrini Green, a public housing development that sat on one of the most prime real estate areas of Chicago.

In 1995, the development was demolished slowly and its primarily black residents were forced out. This excerpt from the film takes place at the very beginning of the intense protests to preserve the community. The full hour-long film is streaming online.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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