The Michigan State Capitol Building
AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Walk it back: Last week, Lansing, Michigan’s city council voted to call itself a sanctuary city. Last night it changed its mind, responding to pressure from local businesses, who worried the move “would draw unwelcome attention from the Trump administration,” the AP reports:

“I think ultimately what we learned is … we thought we could define what ‘sanctuary city’ meant, and in actuality, it has its own negative connotation,” [Councilwoman Judi Brown Clarke] said. “The only way to take that away is to take that word away.”

Meanwhile, Portland is joining Seattle to sue Trump over the executive order, and the Department of Homeland Security is “moving quickly to build up [a] nationwide deportation force” that includes cooperation from dozens of local police forces. (AP, Washington Post)

Uber’s underworld: The bad press continues to pile for Uber, with reports that the company secretly tracked competitor drivers with Lyft through a software program called “Hell.” (Tech Crunch)

Houston vs. Portland: Comparing the two cities based on strategies for urban density, a Forbes writer concludes that Houston—much maligned as a “sprawling, incohesive hellscape”—comes out superior in some ways.

Hyperlocal health: In Next City, New York City’s health commissioner describes a new strategy to address health disparities through neighborhood “action centers” that draw from century-old models.

“Vacation movers”: A new study finds that many millennials who relocate for new jobs are treating it as a “vacation move,” with little or no intention of settling down in that city for good. On the other hand, they’re also open to trying out out new cities even when they don’t have a job there yet. (Ladders)

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