Jeff Sessions is pictured
Yuri Gripas/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

ACLU on the ground: In Philadelphia, a highly competitive district attorney’s race sees the ACLU beta-testing a strategy of deploying canvassers (many of them ex-offenders) to swing the local election—the first time the national office has done so. Politico Magazine writes:

In this way, the organization hopes to instill a generation of progressive district attorneys around the country, changing the way crime is prosecuted and reducing the incarceration rate—while also pulling the legal rug out from underneath the ACLU’s federal nemeses, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration.

Detroit vs. Silicon Valley: As U.S. automakers race tech companies to automate driving, Detroit’s car companies are going hard to lure young innovators who would normally head West. (Bloomberg)

• In other Detroit news, the city’s mayor is proposing to buy 385 units of vacant housing for redevelopment for low-income residents. (Crain’s Detroit)

Target on its back: As Charlottesville finds itself a target for white nationalists over its decision to sell off a Robert E. Lee statue, the city’s mayor talks with The New York Times.

Underground U: In Georgia, “Freedom University” offers higher education for undocumented students shut out of public universities—along with a channel for activism. (The New Yorker)

March of the robots: An MIT study predicts that small cities with less than 100,000 residents are most at risk of losing jobs to artificial intelligence and robots. (New Scientist)

The urban lens:

This week, I taught @myjavellana's bro, Phil, how to take the MRT and LRT 🚇

A post shared by Kelvin Tagnipez (@kelvintagnipez) on

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