The Airbnb logo is pictured.
Yuya Shino/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Playing by the rules: Airbnb appears to be learning how to play nice with cities, releasing a progress report yesterday on its policies for cooperating with local governments. The company says it has made great strides by working with cities to improve tax collection, relationships with landlords, and efforts to fight discrimination. Axios reports:

"We're obviously blessed with tremendous growth, but with that growth comes responsibility," Airbnb head of policy (and former political advisor to Bill Clinton) Chris Lehane told Axios. This is a notable departure from Airbnb's days of combative behavior toward cities, such as refusing to share host data and insisting its just an online marketplace that shouldn't be regulated like other property-rental companies.

ICE fired up: Immigration arrests have shot up nearly 40 percent during President Trump’s first three months, with the data reflecting an overturn of Obama’s policy to prioritize arrests for the most serious criminals. “More than half of the increase in arrests were of immigrants who had committed no crime other than being in the country without permission,” The New York Times reports.

See also: Attorneys general from five states and D.C. are coordinating to fight against Trump’s push to punish sanctuary cities. (USA Today)

“Keep St. Paul Boring”: That catchphrase has gone viral, for some to mock NIMBY distress over issues like bike lanes and housing density; for others to just affectionately own the city’s dullness. Other cities sampling the slogan: Raleigh and Albany. (Star-Tribune)

Rust Belt foodies: A handful of pioneering chefs have created thriving food scenes across the Great Lakes region, lending a boost to long-struggling urban cores in Cleveland, Detroit, and Buffalo. (Thrillist)

Housing crunch: The feds’ plan to tear down two public housing projects in Cairo, Illinois, could cause hundreds of residents to scatter elsewhere for low-income rentals—at a time when the small city can scarcely afford to lose population. (New York Times)

Walk in the park: San Francisco is the first city in the U.S. to have every resident live within a 10-minute walk to a park or open space, according to the Trust for Public Land. (San Francisco Chronicle)

The urban lens:

Share your city scenes on Instagram with #citylabontheground

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    A Horrifying Glimpse Into Your Dystopian Future Transit Commute

    A comic artist’s take on what the future of transportation might really feel like.

  2. a photo of bikes on a bridge in Amsterdam
    Transportation

    Street by Street, Amsterdam Is Cutting Cars Out of the Picture

    Armed with a street-design tool called the knip, the Dutch capital is slashing car access in the city center, and expanding public transit hours.

  3. A cyclist rides on the bike lane in the Mid Market neighborhood during Bike to Work Day in San Francisco,
    Perspective

    Why Asking for Bike Lanes Isn't Smart

    In the 1930s big auto dreamed up freeways and demanded massive car infrastructure. Micromobility needs its own Futurama—one where cars are marginalized.

  4. Uber Eats worker
    Life

    The Millennial Urban Lifestyle Is About to Get More Expensive

    As WeWork crashes and Uber bleeds cash, the consumer-tech gold rush may be coming to an end.

  5. a photo of a WeWork office building
    Life

    What WeWork’s Demise Could Do to NYC Real Estate

    The troubled coworking company is the largest office tenant in New York City. What happens to the city’s commercial real estate market if it goes under?

×