The Airbnb logo is pictured.
Yuya Shino/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Playing by the rules: Airbnb appears to be learning how to play nice with cities, releasing a progress report yesterday on its policies for cooperating with local governments. The company says it has made great strides by working with cities to improve tax collection, relationships with landlords, and efforts to fight discrimination. Axios reports:

"We're obviously blessed with tremendous growth, but with that growth comes responsibility," Airbnb head of policy (and former political advisor to Bill Clinton) Chris Lehane told Axios. This is a notable departure from Airbnb's days of combative behavior toward cities, such as refusing to share host data and insisting its just an online marketplace that shouldn't be regulated like other property-rental companies.

ICE fired up: Immigration arrests have shot up nearly 40 percent during President Trump’s first three months, with the data reflecting an overturn of Obama’s policy to prioritize arrests for the most serious criminals. “More than half of the increase in arrests were of immigrants who had committed no crime other than being in the country without permission,” The New York Times reports.

See also: Attorneys general from five states and D.C. are coordinating to fight against Trump’s push to punish sanctuary cities. (USA Today)

“Keep St. Paul Boring”: That catchphrase has gone viral, for some to mock NIMBY distress over issues like bike lanes and housing density; for others to just affectionately own the city’s dullness. Other cities sampling the slogan: Raleigh and Albany. (Star-Tribune)

Rust Belt foodies: A handful of pioneering chefs have created thriving food scenes across the Great Lakes region, lending a boost to long-struggling urban cores in Cleveland, Detroit, and Buffalo. (Thrillist)

Housing crunch: The feds’ plan to tear down two public housing projects in Cairo, Illinois, could cause hundreds of residents to scatter elsewhere for low-income rentals—at a time when the small city can scarcely afford to lose population. (New York Times)

Walk in the park: San Francisco is the first city in the U.S. to have every resident live within a 10-minute walk to a park or open space, according to the Trust for Public Land. (San Francisco Chronicle)

The urban lens:

Share your city scenes on Instagram with #citylabontheground

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    Who’s Really Buying Property in San Francisco?

    A lot of software developers, according to an unprecedented new analysis.

  2. Environment

    No, Puerto Rico’s New Climate-Change Law Is Not a ‘Green New Deal’

    Puerto Rico just adopted legislation that commits it to generating all its power from renewable sources. Here’s what separates that from what’s going on in D.C.

  3. A toddler breathes from a nebulizer while sitting in a crib.
    Environment

    How Scientists Discovered What Dirty Air Does to Kids’ Health

    The landmark Children’s Health Study tracked thousands of children in California over many years—and transformed our understanding of air pollution’s harms.

  4. a photo of a beach in Hawaii
    Transportation

    Could Hawaii Be Paradise For Hydrogen-Powered Public Transit?

    As prices drop for renewable power, some researchers hope the island state could be the ideal testbed for hydrogen fuel cells in public transportation.

  5. A large crowd packs Independence Mall, with Philadelphia buildings in the background.
    Environment

    What Happened to Earth Day?

    In the beginning, it was a policy-shaking event that awakened a new generation of activists. But now even environmentalists have misgivings about it.