Attorney General Jeff Sessions
Aaron Bernstein/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Justice watch: After three recent high-profile fatal police shootings, civil rights activists are watching closely for how Donald Trump’s Justice Department will handle the racially charged incidents. AP reports:

[D]rawing any conclusions about the department from those cases is risky, in part because each one is different and because prosecutions of officers are difficult and rare no matter the administration. And while Attorney General Jeff Sessions has said he believes sweeping federal investigations of police departments can hurt officer morale and undermine crime-fighting, he has also promised his Justice Department will prosecute individual officers who break the law.

What’s in a neighborhood: A new book explores the D.C. trend of capitalizing on a neighborhood’s black heritage, or even its “edgy” poverty and crime, to market it to white Millennials. (Washington Post)

The house that pot built: In Colorado, revenue raised from recreational marijuana could go toward building affordable housing for the homeless—one of several examples of how state and local experiments with using pot sales for urban policies. (Arch Paper)

[Twin] cities vs. state: Lawmakers in Minneapolis and St. Paul have found themselves at odds with the GOP-controlled state legislature over issues like light rail, minimum wage, and paid leave, as the state shifts priorities outside metro areas. (Minn Post)

Identity crisis: Atlanta’s northern suburbs, the once-GOP bastions that launched Newt Gingrich, are seeing a sea change as more non-white, non-Republican residents settle in. (New York Times)

Soda money: Santa Fe voters resoundingly rejected a soda tax proposal this week, despite unprecedented spending from political groups behind the campaign. Now soda tax advocates are shifting attention to cities like Seattle and Portland. (AP)

Mapping traffic death: A Los Angeles-based studio worked with the city to develop a map of where pedestrians and cyclists have died in traffic, an attempt to humanize the problem of unsafe roads. (Fast Company)

The urban lens:

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