Chicago has lost more people than any other major city in America. Jim Young/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Back to the ‘burbs: For the first time since 2010, U.S. suburbs are growing faster than cities, according to latest Census figures. Nationwide, the cities losing the most people are Chicago, Baltimore, Milwaukee and Detroit. Big picture, the trend is a “return to normal,” The Washington Post writes:

Since the middle of the 20th century, when people started buying cars and building homes outside of cities en masse, the suburbs had maintained their edge. It was only in 2010 that city growth began to outpace suburban growth.

The turnaround belies the much-hyped narrative that millennials have shunned the suburbs because they preferred city living, said William Frey, a senior demographer at the Brookings Institution.

  • See also: The Texas ‘burbs are once again dominating the list of fastest-growing cities. (Dallas News)

Think different: In an interview Wednesday, HUD Secretary Ben Carson elaborated his views that poverty is a “state of mind,” telling a SiriusXM Radio host: “You take somebody with the wrong mindset, you can give them everything in the world, they'll work their way right back down to the bottom.” (The Washington Post)

Cop watch: Activists warn that an L.A. measure purporting to increase citizen oversight of police will actually end up favoring officers accused of wrongdoing. It’s one of many tricky efforts across the country to form disciplinary boards that incorporate civilians. (Governing)

State of the city: Analyzing speeches of 120 mayors across the country, the National League of Cities found the mayors taking a bigger lead providing safety nets, tackling issues like paid leave, minimum wage, and immigration. But where does tech fall?  (Next City, GovTech)

$70 billion: That’s how much financial analysts say Google’s self-driving car unit, Waymo, is worth, citing the potential of the new joint venture with Lyft. (Newsweek)

It’s not geography: On a road trip through Middle America, The New York Times’s  Tom Friedman writes that our country’s big divide isn’t between coasts and interiors, but “strong communities and weak communities.” Key to the strong ones: coalitions that translate education into jobs.

The urban lens:

Old + new #Blackhawkbikepath #citylabontheground

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