A Muslim woman, who preferred not to giver her name, prays at a makeshift memorial for two men who were killed on a commuter train while trying to stop another man from harassing two young women who appeared to be Muslim. Terray Sylvester/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Free speech questions: As Portland reels from the fatal stabbing of two men who tried to stop another passenger from shouting Muslim slurs aboard a commuter train, the mayor is asking the feds to block two upcoming protests in public space: a “Trump Free Speech Rally” and a “March Against Sharia.” The Washington Post reports:

“I know these lines are perceived as pretty fuzzy when we’re dealing with constitutional First Amendment rights,” [professor Tom Hastings] told The Washington Post. “But there’s no long fuse anymore. Everybody’s fuse seems to be quite short.”

Sanctuary protests: Hundreds of demonstrators descended on the Texas Capitol building on the final day of the legislative session Monday to object to the state’s new sanctuary city ban, with one lawmaker reportedly calling calling ICE on the protestors. (Dallas News, Texas Tribune)

  • See also: When it comes to enforcing immigration law, the attitudes of local sheriffs make a difference, new research concludes. (Washington Post)

No-frills driverless: While the self-driving car hype has typically centered on Silicon Valley stars and luxury products, across Europe driverless projects are focusing on utilitarian mass transit vehicles that aren’t much faster than walking. (New York Times)

Hot cities: The “urban heat island effect” could make some world cities 14.4 degrees warmer by the next century, with losses of economic output up to 11 percent. (Guardian)

Impeachment momentum: A growing number of city and town governments, including several in Massachusetts, are pushing state representatives to launch impeachment proceedings against President Trump. (Politico)

Building up the Everglades: In Miami, a new task force is studying whether to shift the “imaginary line” that restricts urban development in the Everglades area. (Miami Herald)

The urban lens:

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