A man at a job fair is pictured.
Mark Makela/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Unequal measures: A new report from the National Urban League shows black and Hispanic Americans continuing to trail far behind whites economically, with prospects growing dimmer under President Donald Trump. The Washington Post reports:

The economic inequalities exist in all parts of the country, the report shows, but the income and unemployment gap is wider in certain cities.

For the second year in a row, Milwaukee was the least equal metropolitan area for African Americans, with a black unemployment rate of 14 percent compared with 3 percent for whites. Other Midwestern cities such as Toledo, Cleveland, Chicago and Detroit also fared poorly in terms of racial disparities in unemployment.

Cities v. banks: In a case responding to Miami’s experience with the 2008 housing crisis, the Supreme Court has cleared the path for cities to sue banks over predatory lending practices that lead to urban blight—though the standard will be high for cities to prove direct harm. (L.A. Times)

All about the money: Route Fifty breaks down how the latest federal funding package affects local governments, including: continued funding for sanctuary cities, a boost for community policing, and preservation of Community Development Block Grants. One loser: high-speed rail.

Taxing the rich: Seattle’s city council has advanced an income tax targeting the highest earners, though the measure—pushed by a coalition called “Trump Proof Seattle”—will almost certainly face court challenges ahead. (Seattle Times)

Fight the power: In a case many view as a bellwether for startups flexing legal muscle, Airbnb yesterday conceded many demands to its hometown city of San Francisco, but also demonstrated the rewards for taking on regulators. (Washington Post)

Pill crackdown: Florida officials have launched a series of “opioid workshops” to combat the epidemic, starting in the hard-hit Palm Beach County. Meanwhile, Canada’s largest private addiction treatment company is offering $500,000 worth of free treatment. (Sun Sentinel, Vancouver Sun)

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