Julian Castro
Joshua Roberts/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

No filter: Unleashed from White House rules, former U.S. Housing Secretary Julián Castro is no longer keeping quiet with his political opinions. Back home in San Antonio—where he was once mayor—he finds a perch to keep watch over Trump and the state of Texas on issues like immigration, while insisting he’s not running for office in 2018. (NBC News)

End of the line: Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has called an end to his his re-election campaign, aborting a political career that’s spanned decades amid allegations of child sex abuse in the 1980s, which he denies. (Seattle Times)

Opioid antidote: Cambridge, Massachusetts, could become the first city to allow easy public access to Narcan, a medication that can revive people from overdoses, via lockboxes on street corners. Now the question is, would anyone use it? (New York Times)

  • See also: Maryland, Virginia, and D.C. leaders launch a coordinated attack against the opioid epidemic. (Baltimore Sun)

Engineering healthy towns: Politico takes a look at the walkability movement as it becomes a public health imperative across the country, steering policy and construction projects not just in big cities, but in Red State towns confronting the obesity crisis.

Hollywood ride: L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti’s musings on the concept for a gondola to ferry visitors to the beloved Hollywood sign have revived the debate of how the city can ensure tourist access while protecting neighborhoods. (L.A. Times)

The urban lens:

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