Julian Castro
Joshua Roberts/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

No filter: Unleashed from White House rules, former U.S. Housing Secretary Julián Castro is no longer keeping quiet with his political opinions. Back home in San Antonio—where he was once mayor—he finds a perch to keep watch over Trump and the state of Texas on issues like immigration, while insisting he’s not running for office in 2018. (NBC News)

End of the line: Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has called an end to his his re-election campaign, aborting a political career that’s spanned decades amid allegations of child sex abuse in the 1980s, which he denies. (Seattle Times)

Opioid antidote: Cambridge, Massachusetts, could become the first city to allow easy public access to Narcan, a medication that can revive people from overdoses, via lockboxes on street corners. Now the question is, would anyone use it? (New York Times)

  • See also: Maryland, Virginia, and D.C. leaders launch a coordinated attack against the opioid epidemic. (Baltimore Sun)

Engineering healthy towns: Politico takes a look at the walkability movement as it becomes a public health imperative across the country, steering policy and construction projects not just in big cities, but in Red State towns confronting the obesity crisis.

Hollywood ride: L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti’s musings on the concept for a gondola to ferry visitors to the beloved Hollywood sign have revived the debate of how the city can ensure tourist access while protecting neighborhoods. (L.A. Times)

The urban lens:

Share your city scenes on Instagram with #citylabontheground

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    How Seattle Bucked a National Trend and Got More People to Ride the Bus

    Three experts in three very different positions weigh in on their city’s ridership success.

  2. Design

    Experimental City: The Sci-Fi Utopia That Never Was

    With solar energy, recycling, computers, and personal mass transit, the 1960s-era Minnesota Experimental City was a prescient and hopeful vision of the urban future. A new documentary tells its story.

  3. Equity

    The Side Pittsburgh Doesn't Want You to See

    Pittsburgh filmmaker Chris Ivey has spent over twelve years documenting the lives of the people displaced so that the city can achieve its “cool” status.  

  4. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  5. Transportation

    In Copenhagen, Bike Commuting Gets a Little Less Popular

    Denmark’s capital may be a cyclists’ paradise, but recent trends show what’s really necessary to sustain a bike boom.