Jeff Sessions is pictured
Mike Blake/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Crime clampdown: In his first major stamp on criminal justice policy, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has ordered federal prosecutors to go after the toughest possible charges and sentences for crime suspects, rolling back the Obama administration’s approach. The New York Times reports:

That guidance now replaces the orders of former Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., who in 2013 encouraged prosecutors to consider the individual circumstances of a case and to exercise discretion in charging drug crimes. Mr. Holder directed prosecutors — when considering nonviolent defendants with insignificant criminal histories and no connections to drug trafficking or other criminal organizations — to omit details about drug quantities from charging documents so as not to trigger automatically harsh penalties.

Trial time: The Waymo vs. Uber case will be heading to trial after a judge ruled that the lawsuit over Uber’s alleged theft of trade secrets could not be settled through private arbitration. (CNBC)

Cue the QLine: Detroit’s new streetcar debuts with fanfare this morning, though people will be watching closely to assess the system’s long-term viability. (Detroit News)

Apple mysteries: Business Insider digs into the latest with Apple’s elusive Project Titan, hearing that the company is working on an entire “transportation platform” rather than just a self-driving car.

Homes for teachers: San Francisco’s mayor cut through years of idle talk on teacher housing by devoting $44 million to build up to 150 affordable rental units—inspired in part by the story of a public school teacher who went homeless. (San Francisco Chronicle)

Eastern drift: Why do so many cities worldwide have poor east sides? The Guardian’s inquiry finds one explanation in air pollution patterns.

The urban lens:

Diglis Bridge just outside Worcester city centre, UK #citylabontheground #citylabontheriver

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