A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Stirring the pot: U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is asking congressional leaders to undo protections that keep the Justice Department removed from states’ medical marijuana policies. The Washington Post reports:

Advocates have been closely watching the Trump administration for any sign of how it might tackle the politically complex issue of marijuana legalization. Candidate Trump had offered support of state-level medical marijuana regulations, including the notion that states should be free to do what they want on the policy. But Sessions's letter, with its explicit appeal to allow the Justice Department to go after medical marijuana providers, appears to undermine that support.

Uber controversies: As the public awaits findings today from an investigation of Uber’s corporate culture, the L.A. Times gauges investors’ reactions to recent scandals. Meanwhile, the New York Times reveals that CEO Travis Kalanick has been able to yield more control of Uber through employee share sales that grant him voting rights.

Domino effect: Houston is considering joining San Antonio, Dallas, and Austin in suing the state of Texas over its sanctuary cities law, after the chain started with the small border city of El Cenizo. (USA Today)

Money for cities: The Knight Cities Challenge is giving out $5 million to several revitalization and community projects across the country, including five in Detroit, including one “urban beach.” (AP, Crain’s Detroit)

Car-free backlash: Oslo, Norway, wanted to be the first European city to ban cars from its downtown, but backlash forced a modified yet still controversial plan: banning parking.­ (The Guardian)

Freeway capping: Philadelphia now has nearly all of the $225 million it needs to cap four acres of I-95 to reconnect the city to the waterfront, with new features like an ice rink. (Next City)

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