FBI investigators work the scene of a shooting near at a baseball field in Alexandria, Virginia, where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and others were shot. Alex Brandon/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

What’s your take?: Wednesday’s shooting at a baseball practice for Republican members of Congress has reignited a debate over gun control, and perhaps more than anything, it’s giving both sides the chance to see what they want. The Washington Post reports:

For those in favor of gun control, that the shooter legally owned and carried a permit for the military-style semiautomatic rifle he used in a public place proved their point that too many guns with too much firepower are far too accessible. If he had not had access to such a rifle, would he have been able to injure multiple people?

For gun rights supporters, that armed officers from the U.S. Capitol Police stopped the shooter and prevented what could have been a mass slaying showed the importance of having guns in public so people can defend themselves against such attacks. Imagine what would have happened if it had been regular citizens on that field with no security detail in sight?

Charges in Flint: Five Michigan officials, including the head of the state health department, have been charged with involuntary manslaughter for their role in the Flint water contamination crisis contributing to an outbreak of Legionnaire’s disease. (The New York Times)

Police reform: A host of civil rights groups including Black Lives Matter have filed a federal lawsuit to spur court-ordered reforms for the Chicago Police Department. (Chicago Tribune)

The Heroin Tracker: Cincinnati’s chief data officer highlights the value of the city’s new web platform tracking heroin overdoses by day, time, location, and ambulance response. (Governing)

Divvy up: The city of Chicago will be adding 40 more stations and 400 more bikes to Divvy, increasing the bike-sharing system’s density into new areas. (Streetsblog)

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