A banner of Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May is pictured.
Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

U.K. vote: As London continues to grapple with the fallout from Saturday’s attack, voters in Britain head to the polls today in a snap election predicted to give Prime Minister Theresa May a larger parliamentary majority to support Brexit negotiations. Reuters reports:

The attacks threw the campaign spotlight onto security and prompted questions from May's opponents and media about her record overseeing cuts in police numbers during her years as interior minister from 2010 to 2016.

But the security issue was not seen as helpful to her main rival, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who has voted against counter-terrorism legislation and expressed reservations in the past about police shoot-to-kill tactics.

Solar vision: With Elon Musk stepping up as a leader to the clean-energy revolution, counter to Trump’s Paris withdrawal, all eyes are on his plans for the biggest solar-panel factory in the western hemisphere in Buffalo, N.Y. Fast Company reports on local hopes for “Gigafactory 2.0.”

Pittsburgh and Paris unite: The mayors of the two cities that were linked in President Trump’s speech withdrawing from the Paris accord present a united front in a New York Times op-ed committing to the climate agreement’s goals.

Portland’s past: Recent violent episodes in Portland have shone new light on the city and the state of Oregon’s legacy of excluding and displacing black people, which many link to today’s boiling culture of white supremacy. (Portland Tribune, Washington Post)

Top tech: A new report on top U.S. tech cities places Los Angeles and New York toward the end of the list of 25, trailing behind the predictable winners Silicon Valley and San Francisco. Denver came in eighth. (Los Angeles Times, Colorado Real Estate Journal)

Weed warehouses: Industrial rents are poised to climb in cities where marijuana is legal, especially in California and Massachusetts, as “ganjapreneurs” snap up warehouse space for their startups. (Bloomberg)

Suing Los Angeles: The city is the target of a federal lawsuit for its failure to develop affordable housing for disabled people, despite accepting millions in funds for that purpose. (Reuters)

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