People gather on the Andy Warhol bridge over the Allegheny River in downtown Pittsburgh. Gene J. Puskar/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

In the spotlight: The Steel City finds itself in the international spotlight after President Donald Trump’s remark in his climate announcement that he was “elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris.” Though some GOP leaders praised Trump’s move, many shot back vehemently to disassociate—including Mayor Bill Peduto. The Pittsburgh Post Gazette reports:

Regarding the namedrop, Pittsburgh’s top elected official said: "I'm appalled that the president used my city to justify his unacceptable decision, as most other Pittsburghers are. I was one of the nation's mayors who went to Paris to fight for the accords, and my city, which has finally bounced back from decades of industrial carnage, will do all it can to promote its own environmental standards.”

From the CityLab archive: Here’s what Pittsburgh looked like when it decided it had a pollution problem.

Bloomberg steps in: Buoyed by Michael Bloomberg and his offer of $14 million, a coalition of mayors, governors, universities, and businesses is forming to submit its own plan to the United Nations to meet the U.S. requirements of the Paris climate accord. (The New York Times)

HUD vision: Housing boss Ben Carson yesterday emphasized the value of home-buying as a core to the economy, kicking off Trump’s declared National Homeowner Month as upcoming budget talks are expected to clarify the secretary's federal vision. (Housing Wire, AP)

The slow decay of Sears: The Washington Post tracks the rise and fall of the once-icon of American retail over “decades of missed opportunities,” as part of the larger trend of brick-and-mortar instability in the age of e-commerce.

Google London: The plans for Google’s new London headquarters envision a “landscraper” as long as a skyscraper is tall, with a rooftop park and room for 4,500 employees. (Inc.com)

Fighting bankruptcy: As numerous cities find themselves imperiled by ballooning pension obligations, Dallas and Houston have worked out legislation to avert the crisis—though the solutions they found might not be legal in other places. (New York Times)

Biking equity: Portland State University researchers are looking at bike-sharing systems in New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago to identify barriers to riding for low-income people and people of color. (Streetsblog)

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