British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks outside 10 Downing Street after an attack on London Bridge. Kevin Coombs/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Tense election: Following Saturday’s rampage in London—the third serious terrorist attack in the country in recent months—Britons prepare to head to the polls in an election once expected to be landslide for Prime Minister Theresa May. May took a combative tone after the most recent attack, saying there is “far too much tolerance for extremism in our country.” Her chief rival, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, talked public safety in an age of austerity. The Washington Post reports:

“You cannot protect the public on the cheap,” Corbyn said in a speech in the northern English city of Carlisle that ended a brief pause in formal campaigning. “The police and security services must get the resources they need, not 20,000 police cuts.”

Portland clashes: Police arrested 14 people and seized weapons in downtown Portland Sunday as thousands converged in protest. The demonstrations—Trump supporters facing off against various larger counter-demonstrations—happened despite the mayor’s attempt to revoke a federal permit for them in the aftermath of last weekend’s racially charged killings. (The Los Angeles Times)

U.S. cities for Paris: Leaders in many U.S. urban centers (i.e. Newark) are vocally condemning President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris accord, while many are taking action on the local level to double down on the agreement’s climate change goals. (NJ.com, Citiscope)

  • Going local: A New York Times columnist argues that while cities should continue to stand up against harmful national policies, they also must “fortify themselves from within” to advance racial equity and reimagine government.

Steering the future: Can GM—a company identified with the auto industry’s bygone glory days—compete with Silicon Valley rivals like Google and Uber to take a leading role in the self-driving car revolution? (New York Times)

  • See also: What does the rise of autonomous cars mean for people who drive for a living? Those careers are particularly worth watching, Next City notes, because they are economic multipliers at the city level, raising poverty levels for workers without degrees.

The new suburbs: Once synonymous with middle-class whites, U.S. suburban communities are becoming the new melting pots. The Christian Science Monitor focuses on the trend in the Houston suburbs, finding some old divisions and politics still holding strong.

The urban lens:

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