Elon Musk and Steve Bannon are pictured
Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Tech vs. Trump: As President Donald Trump threatens to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement, the tech industry is speaking out in a big way. Tesla CEO Elon Musk suggested he would quit his White House advisory role over the reported Paris withdrawal, and a band of major tech companies—including Apple, Facebook, and Google—plan for a full-page ad in the New York Times urging Trump to stay in. Politico reports:

Tech CEOs have been under widespread pressure, including in some cases from their own liberal-leaning workforces, to cut off engagement with Trump over his stances on immigration, LGBT issues and the environment. IBM's Ginni Rometty, for example, was the target of a campaign by employees to uphold the company's "core values of diversity, inclusiveness, and ethical business conduct" in response to her outreach to Trump early in his administration.

Musk's warning carries particular weight because he's become one of the Trump White House's go-to tech industry executives. The Tesla and SpaceX CEO has taken part, for example, in the so-called President’s Strategic and Policy Forum.

See also: The U.S. Conference of Mayors will consider a move to formally establish support for the goal of 100 percent renewable energy in cities nationwide. (Curbed)

A tale of two carpools: While Google's Waze unit expands its paid carpooling service throughout California, Uber faces more bad press in San Francisco as leaked documents reveal the company burned through vast sums of money to subsidize the growth of UberPool. (AP, Buzzfeed)

Car-free Times Square? The fatal crash in Times Square this month has revived a conversation over whether New York City should ban vehicles entirely from the area, transforming it into a series of pedestrian plazas. (AP)

Mapping the opioid crisis: A newly updated visualization tool uses government data on prescriptions, deaths, and local policies to provide a narrative tour of the U.S. opioid epidemic—including personal accounts of Americans who have died from addiction. (State Scoop)

Bike boom: A new study looks at one of the largest rapid-fire biking investments in world history—in Seville, Spain—finding that bike trips soared and safety risks plummeted with the new abundance of connected lanes. (Streetsblog)

NIMBYism = segregation: The pattern of city governments caving to NIMBY protests of affordable housing has perpetuated a history of racial exclusion and prevented the growth of true “mixed-income” communities, a Houston housing advocates argues in Next City.

The urban lens:

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