Two NYPD officers behind police tape.
Brendan McDermid/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

A gentler approach: Police across the U.S. are on the front lines of the opioid crisis, but this isn’t turning out to be the same old “War on Drugs.” From investigating overdoses as murders to offering treatment as an alternative to jail, police leaders say they “have learned from the past,” The New York Times reports:

“The police can play a critical role in a very broadly based social and medical response,” said Samuel Walker, an emeritus professor of criminal justice at the University of Nebraska Omaha. “So if people think we are going to arrest our way out of the opioid crisis, they’re wrong.”

From the CityLab archives: The 5 Scariest Things About Jeff Sessions's New War on Drugs

Election shake-up?: Watch today for the Supreme Court’s ruling in a dispute over Wisconsin’s 2011 reshaping of congressional districts. A lower court ruled that state Republicans took unconstitutional steps by redrawing districts to favor the GOP. If SCOTUS agrees, it could “mark a watershed moment for the way American elections are conducted.” (Washington Post)

Been there, done that: During “Infrastructure Week,” President Donald Trump promised to create new government offices dedicated to cutting red tape. But the office he described already exists: it was created by President Obama in 2015. (USA Today)  

From the CityLab archives: We Remember Infrastructure Week

Uber’s bumpy ride: Uber’s board is taking a good, long look at how the company’s culture got so toxic, and the consequences could go all the way to the top. An internal investigation conducted by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder recommends ousting a senior vice president, and the board is also weighing a leave of absence for CEO Travis Kalanick. (New York Times)

What’s in a city?: Phoenix recently reclaimed its spot as the fifth-largest city in America, but that doesn’t mean it’ll ever have the urban vibe of smaller cities like Boston, Philadelphia, or Seattle. Amid some soul-searching, The Arizona Republic asks: Is Phoenix a “real” city—and does it even want to be one?

The urban lens:

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