Supporters for Jon Ossoff are pictured.
Christopher Aluka Berry/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Slipping away: Even though the Republican candidate won in Georgia’s special election on Tuesday, the GOP’s stronghold in America’s suburbs—an identity fixed in place with post-World War II growth trends—can be seen eroding now as suburbs diversify and align politically with their neighboring big cities. Reflecting on this week’s election results in Georgia, Politico writes:

Karen Handel’s Georgia special election victory Tuesday enabled the GOP to kick the can down the road, but not for long. The same Atlanta suburbs that once produced Republicans like Newt Gingrich voted for Clinton in November. They followed up a few months later by nearly sending a 30-year-old, first-time Democratic candidate to Congress. Republicans may be gloating now, but it’s an ominous sign for the 2018 midterm elections, when control of the House is likely to hinge on roughly two or three dozen suburban districts currently held by the GOP.

Fire aftermath: As the U.K. government prepares to relocate survivors of the Grenfell Tower disaster into a luxury apartment development where units sell for millions, British Prime Minister Theresa May reports that 600 buildings in England still have cladding similar to the type blamed for quickening the fatal high-rise fire. (Curbed, Washington Post)

Climate counterpoint: A former D.C. energy director pokes holes in the narrative that cities are leading the way with climate change, pointing to minimal progress on solar and energy efficiency, and those lofty but intangible “100 percent renewable” goals. (Green Tech Media)

  • For more: CityLab’s Laura Bliss writes about the heated debate over the true costs of going 100 percent renewable.

Census time machine: As the latest U.S. census figures show the nation growing older and more racially diverse, The New York Times offers a visualization of our changing demographics, declaring:“Sioux Falls Is the Past, Staten Island the Present, Las Vegas the Future.”

Family values: How does Vancouver have thousands of families while the prevailing trend remains for couples with kids to move to the suburbs? With Vox, the city’s former chief planner explains how bigger housing, family amenities, and public safety have changed the tide.

Mayors vs. HUD cuts: Mayors convening this week in Miami are considering formal opposition to President Trump’s proposed HUD cuts, including Community Development Block Grants and the HOME program for affordable housing. (Route Fifty)

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