James Comey's explosive testimony before Congress coincided with Trump's Infrastructure Week.
We're tired, too. Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

In case you were distracted, here’s what you missed, via Twitter.

Even if former FBI director James Comey hadn’t been scheduled to deliver an explosive testimony to Congress, in which he described apparently deliberate attempts by the American president to halt the bureau’s investigation into Russia’s interference with the 2016 election, it’s safe to say Infrastructure Week would have fallen somewhat flat.

That’s because President Trump’s $1 trillion infrastructure “plan” remains untethered to anything resembling legislation. The most we know is that the White House hopes to “leverage” $200 billion in federal funds to attract another $800 billion in private investment. Nobody who knows anything about infrastructure believes this will work. That didn’t stop the president from five days of speech-ifying and document-signing in the name of “addressing America's crumbling infrastructure,” though.

Meanwhile, Comey’s testimony marked a watershed moment in the biggest political scandal in modern American memory. When the history books close on this chapter, they better not forget to mention: This week was supposed to be Infrastructure Week.

With that, a favorite tweet for each of the last five days:

Monday:

Trump signs some routine memos accompanied by a military band, sends characteristically off-topic tweets:

Tuesday:

About that $1 trillion. Seems like something’s missing?

Wednesday:

“Today we will build the dreams that will open new paths to a better tomorrow,” Trump told a members-only audience of a Cincinnati marina. If only the president were capable of this kind of poetry:

Thursday:

Vice President Pence gets into the theme with some mayors and governors...

… while Comey offers a shocking testimony to Congress:

Friday:

Trump meets with DOT, surely to explain his proposed budget cuts. What won’t we build next?

About the Author

Laura Bliss
Laura Bliss

Laura Bliss is a staff writer at CityLab.

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