HHS Secretary Tom Price, President Donald Trump, and Vice President Mike Pence in the Oval Office. Carlos Barria/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

What to do about opioids?: Today marks the first meeting of a bipartisan commission appointed by President Trump to address the nation's opioid crisis. Experts, however, are calling for quicker emergency action as questions remain about how much attention the panel can command from Trump's administration. The New York Times reports:

John P. Walters, who led the Office of National Drug Control Policy under President George W. Bush, said he hoped the Trump administration would approach the opioid problem with “a much more extensive surveillance effort,” saying a federal lag in reporting overdose data was “shameful.”

“I think we need a revolution here, and at its essence has to be to truly understand this as an epidemic and begin to map it, follow up, find individuals who are at risk and more aggressively encourage them to get treatment,” he said.

“National Treasure”: That’s the newest designation for Philadelphia—the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s first granting of that label to an entire city. The effort came at the mayor’s request, after the city lost a spate of high-profile historic buildings in recent years. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

Family planning: Lynne Patton, a Trump family event planner and former VP of Eric Trump’s foundation, has been appointed to head the HUD region including New York and New Jersey, despite criticisms over her lack of housing experience and questions over her law degree. (NY Daily News)

Transpo cuts: U.S. House lawmakers from both sides of the aisle raised concerns Thursday with Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao about plans to cut funds that help local governments pay for infrastructure—including the New Starts and TIGER grants. (Route Fifty)

No “SoHa”: New York state Senator Brian Benjamin has introduced a bill aiming to prevent and penalize brokers and real estate agents from renaming neighborhoods and marketing them to wealthy buyers. (Next City)

The urban lens:

13.6.17- Rainy Days ☔️

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