A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Civil rights centennial: New York City had never witnessed such a scene: 100 years ago today, a procession of nearly 10,000 African-Americans marched down Fifth Avenue, women and children in white gowns, men in dark suits. The demonstration, organized by a then-nascent NAACP, was spurred by recent lynchings and violence targeting African-Americans, including a mob in East St. Louis. As one scholar writes in the Miami Herald:

The “Silent Protest Parade” marked the beginning of a new epoch in the long black freedom struggle. While adhering to a certain politics of respectability, a strategy employed by African-Americans that focused on countering racist stereotypes through dignified appearance and behavior, the protest, within its context, constituted a radical claiming of the public sphere and a powerful affirmation of black humanity. It declared that a “New Negro” had arrived and launched a black public protest tradition that would be seen in the parades of the Universal Negro Improvement Association, the civil rights demonstrations of the 1960s and the Black Lives Matter marches of today.

Funding save: A Senate committee vote yesterday maintained funding for several grant programs that the Trump administration proposed slashing but cities have fought to preserve, including TIGER grants, Community Development Block Grants, and New Starts. (Route Fifty)

All eyes on Wisconsin: Officials gathered in Milwaukee yesterday to host a welcoming party for Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn, celebrating the Apple supplier’s plans for a $10 billion factory in Wisconsin promising thousands of jobs. It seems the city itself might be part of the deal, as the electronics giant looks for an assembly site with airport access in addition to its massive factory in a yet-undecided rural area. (Journal Sentinel, Urban Milwaukee)

Fighting the blah: Though Charlotte’s South End neighborhood has added thousands of residents, along wth new restaurants and breweries, many have complained about the blandness of the new development. A new vision plan attempts to spice things up with ideas for public art, bike lanes, and new parks. (Charlotte Observer)

Smart City check-in: In the year since Columbus, Ohio sealed $50 million in grants in the “Smart City Challenge,” there’s not much visible progress to be seen, but the city is working quietly behind the scenes on projects including mobility hubs and electric transport. (Smart Cities Dive)

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