A locked door is pictured.
Mike Segar/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Segregation effect: In the largest U.S. cities, low-income housing projects that use federal tax credits are perpetuating segregation, according to a New York Times review of data. Fair housing advocates say misuse of the nation’s biggest source of funding for affordable housing is deepening racial divides. From the Times:

While only about a third of census tracts in the nation’s hundred largest metropolitan areas have a majority nonwhite population, 54 percent of new tax-credit projects have been built in those tracts since 2000, according to a Times analysis. And that pattern of placing tax-credit projects in communities with disproportionately high black and Latino populations has been consistent over time, the data shows.

The Treasury Department, which administers the program, includes no provisions in its regulations that address segregation. That, fair-housing advocates argue, runs afoul of the Fair Housing Act, which requires government agencies that administer housing programs to do so in a way that reduces racial segregation.

Self-reflection: Though many in D.C. identify the city’s affordable housing shortage as its biggest problem, a new poll finds that wealthy new homeowners are blaming… wealthy new homeowners… as the cause. (Washington Post)

Rural resentments: In California’s Great Red North—a rural bloc of 13 counties whose ethos is more Texas than Los Angeles—resentment is growing among residents who feel minimized on political issues as their state is depicted as liberal and economically thriving. (New York Times)

More naloxene needed: Though cities across the U.S. have started relying on naloxene—the life-saving antidote to an opioid overdose—the rising prices for the drug are leading to rationing, and some big questions. (Governing)

Closed for the holidays: The state government of New Jersey—including state parks and beaches high in demand for the holidays—remains shut down due to a budget impasse between Republican Gov. Chris Christie and the Democrat-controlled legislature. Christie took heat over the weekend when photos captured him lounging on a state beach he’d ordered closed. (New York Times, AP)

The urban lens:

Hopping on the best bus in town. #citylabontheground

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