A gavel is pictured.
Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Trying something new: Buffalo, N.Y., is playing host to the nation’s first opioid crisis intervention court, an experimental program backed by the U.S. Department of Justice that could serve as a model to other jurisdictions finding traditional drug treatment courts ineffective. AP reports:

"The idea behind it," said court project director Jeffrey Smith, "is only about how many people are still breathing each day when we're finished."

… Acceptance into opioid crisis court means detox, inpatient or outpatient care, 8 p.m. curfews, and at least 30 consecutive days of in-person meetings with the judge. A typical drug treatment court might require such appearances once a week or even once a month.

Housing stakes: Two congressional Democrats are calling for an investigation of President Trump’s financial stakes in Brooklyn’s Starrett City—the nation’s largest federally subsidized housing complex—as they warn of potential conflicts of interest affecting HUD decisions. (New York Times)

Flawed system: Though many are up in arms over the Trump administration’s intent to kill community development block grants, new data from Politico lends support to some criticisms of the HUD program, which often appears to reward wealthy communities instead of impoverished ones.

High alert: As terrorists overseas increasingly turn to cars as weapons, U.S. cities are beefing up security and physical barriers for public spaces with heavy pedestrian traffic—such as the Vegas strip. (Washington Post)

Tunnel vision: Plans are moving forward to revitalize Chicago’s “Pedway”— the underground network of tunnels and corridors that links more than 50 downtown buildings with transit stations—with ideas including an art gallery and library. (Chicago Tribune)

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