Danielle Outlaw is pictured.
Courtesy of the Portland Mayor's Office

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

New boss: Portland’s new police chief, Danielle Outlaw, will be the first African-American woman and only the third city “outsider” to head the bureau. Outlaw, a 19-year veteran of the Oakland police department, comes to Portland at a fraught moment for policing, The Oregonian reports:

Her appointment Monday by Mayor Ted Wheeler comes at a critical time when community and police relations are strained and the force faces a daunting list of federally mandated reforms.

The mayor said Outlaw shares his goals of improving bureau relationships with Portland's communities of color, increasing diversity on the 950-member force and embracing equity.

Arts access: Voters in Seattle have officially shot down “Prop 1,” a sales tax that would have provided funds to arts, culture, and science organizations to increase access for middle- and lower-income families. Critics framed bill as a money grab for large arts institutions. (Seattle Times, The Stranger)

    Cleaning up “Philthadelphia:” Mayor Jim Kenney has announced a new initiative, CleanPHL, to make Philadelphia a “zero waste” city by 2035, tackling problems like illegal dumping and littering. To commemorate the new plan, the Philadelphia Inquirer rounds up some egregious examples of local littering.

    Tackling the tampon taboo: A U.S. Senate bill that would require free access to menstrual products for incarcerated women is the latest expression of a grassroots push for “menstrual equity” across the nation, as four states and two cities (Chicago and D.C.) have approved eliminating the sales tax on tampons and a number of universities and workplaces start stocking free supplies. (Washington Post)

    More, please: The opening of the world’s biggest bike parking garage would be heralded as a success for most places, but for the Dutch city of Utrecht the question is, are 12,500 spaces enough? Residents here make 43 percent of their journeys under 4.6 miles by bike, while, countrywide in the Netherlands, bikes actually outnumber people. (Guardian)

    The urban lens:

    It's a bit much isn't it. #latergram #nofilter #theshard

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