For years, the city has shut off supply to residents who can’t pay their bills.

This story was originally published by Grist, and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

In 2014, United Nations officials sharply criticized Detroit’s practice of shutting off water for residents who couldn’t pay their bills. This year, more than 18,000 residents have been at risk of losing their access. How did Detroit get here? Watch the video above to find out and hear the stories of Detroit residents.

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