Boxes in an Amazon fulfillment center are pictured.
Noah Berger/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Amazon’s ruse? Looking at Amazon’s own criteria for any city that could host its second headquarters, The New York Times suggests Denver is the best option, due its lifestyle, relative affordability, and tech talent. Meanwhile, a Brookings Institution analysis warns that many communities will be wasting their time and resources competing for the headquarters—since Amazon probably already knows exactly where it will be, while opting “to create the illusion of a competition”:

Before communities go all in, they should think about who will ultimately win. Amazon has set the table in a way that ensures that just about every community that plays this game will lose, and not just because all but one place will come away without the grand prize. Many elected officials and economic development professionals will work tirelessly over the upcoming weeks and months to put together the most competitive bids their public coffers will permit.

Sixteen years later: At the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the New York City medical examiner’s office is still working to scientifically identify each of the 2,753 people who were killed in the destruction of the twin towers—only 60 percent of whom have been positively identified so far. (New York Times)

Tomorrow’s cities: Picking up from CityLab co-founder Richard Florida’s recent thoughts on the end of the urban revival, a Bloomberg View column argues that the revival is merely relocating: “Today’s fast-growing suburb is tomorrow’s urban area.”

City farming: Pittsburgh is slated to become home to the country’s largest urban farm in 2019, replacing a former low-income housing area. (Reuters)

Green driving: In London, Uber will require its drivers to use hybrid or fully electric vehicles by 2020—a move the company says is necessary for the city’s particularly severe pollution problems. (Guardian)

The urban lens:

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