Bill de Blasio is pictured.
Mike Segar/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Primary day: The polls are open today in New York City, where incumbent Mayor Bill de Blasio holds a “nearly unassailable position”  in the primary election, in part due to inclusive policies that mark a contrast with Trump’s White House. AP reports:

The story of de Blasio's 2017 re-election in some ways mirrors that of the Democratic Party's broader struggle with racial politics in the age of President Donald Trump.

The president is not on the ballot in Tuesday's mayoral primary or in the November general election. Yet Trump has fueled racial divisions across America that have helped shape de Blasio's push to become the city's first Democrat re-elected mayor since Ed Koch in 1985. De Blasio, like Democrats across America, has been forced into an awkward dance at times with an electorate torn by the Republican president's view on race and immigration.

Nonprofit power: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette dives deep in analyzing the nonprofits that now dominate the city’s post-industrial landscape and economy— employing one in five workers, controlling one-tenth of city property, and amassing a collective $44 billion in assets.

Driverless gets real: GM and its self-driving car startup Cruise Automation have introduced what they call “the world’s first mass-producible car designed to operate without a driver,” meaning the car could be ready to hit the market as soon as the regulatory environment allows. (Business Insider)

Road to recovery: New Orleans’s promising rebound after Katrina—including cleaning up city corruption and progress in schools and housing—can offer an instructive model for Houston and cities in Florida as they recover from hurricane damage, says a former editor at the Times-Picayune. (Politico)

  • See also: Houston saw a tangible sign of returning to normalcy yesterday as tens of thousands of kids returned to school. (Washington Post)

Back-to-back games? There’s a longshot chance the U.S. could host two consecutive Olympics, if there’s any momentum to current talks in Salt Lake City and Denver of bidding for 2026 Winter Games—taking place two years before Los Angeles hosts the Summer Olympics. (AP)

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