A community organizer in Houston helps a Mexican woman whose parents brought her to the U.S. illegally when she was a year old, and her 10-month-old daughter. Elliot Spagat/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

What’s ahead for Houston’s Dreamers? In Houston, some immigrant families’ decisions on rebuilding their lives after Hurricane Harvey hinge upon President Donald Trump’s announcement over his plans for the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program. He’s expected to announce his formal decision today, and ending it could deal another blow to some of the people hit hardest by the storm. The New York Times reports:

This weekend, in a heavily Latino section of northeast Houston, where the soggy innards of hundreds of mobile homes lined the streets, conversations were filled with uncertainty.

Undocumented immigrants, including DACA recipients, do not qualify for cash assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, according to a representative from FEMA, though they can apply on behalf of children who are American citizens.

Lessons from mayors: The leaders of nine U.S. cities sat with New York Magazine to discuss local government from the national perspective—the edge that cities have over Washington, city vs. state tensions, and the urban-rural divide.

New narrative: The mayor of Detroit has created a position believed to be the first of its kind in the U.S.—a “chief storyteller,” tasked with remodeling the city’s narrative as it emerges from decades of decline. African-American journalist Aaron Foley will lead a team in gathering interviews and stories for new local website. (Guardian)

Disappearing parking: As Minneapolis embraces the nationwide urban shift away from favoring cars, thousands of parking spaces have been lost to new development—but are residents really prepared to change their habits? (Star-Tribune)

Preservation misses: Five architecture professors name iconic American buildings they wish had been saved, from an 1891 apartment building in South Side Chicago to a parkway Frederick Law Olmsted designed in Buffalo. (The Conversation)

The urban lens:

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