Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, right, is led into the courtroom.
Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, right, is led into the courtroom. Michael Macor/San Francisco Chronicle via AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Not guilty: In a case that ignited sanctuary city rhetoric around the U.S., a San Francisco jury determined Thursday that an undocumented immigrant is not guilty of murder in the death of Katie Steinle. The case became a catalyst in the Trump administration’s moves to undermine so-called sanctuary city policies, and the president and Attorney General Jeff Sessions were quick to condemn the decision.

Sessions called the verdict “a travesty of justice” and urged city leaders to “consider carefully the harm they are doing to their citizens by refusing to cooperate with federal law enforcement officers.” CNN reports the Justice Department is considering federal charges against Jose Ines Garcia Zarate.

Let the subway sleep? A new master plan suggests a controversial idea for New York City’s vaunted 24-hour subway service: Shut down at night to allow for repairs. It’s part of a broader set of policy recommendations from the Regional Plan Association, the nonprofit’s fourth such document since the 1920s. (AP)

Mapping Amazon’s march: Prospective HQ2 cities, take a look: In the decade since Amazon descended upon Seattle, its footprint on the city has quadrupled—an effect you can now see via GIF, based on 37 building permits the company filed over time. (Seattle Times)

Everyone gets a city lab: More cities should consider building up an applied science team like the one at “The Lab @ DC,” according to two experts writing in Governing, who praise the model embedded within the mayor’s office for measuring and improving city policy on police body cameras, health hotlines, rat eradication, and more.

Building on demand: A month after the world got its first 3D-printed bridge, in the Netherlands, Europe is now seeing its first 3D-printed building: a hotel and office project in Copenhagen that took a mere 50 hours to print on-site. (Construction Dive)

The urban lens:

Show us your city on Instagram using #citylabontheground.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    Why Are So Many People In San Jose Fighting Housing for Teachers?

    The school system’s plan to build affordable apartment units for the city’s teachers has triggered a fierce backlash in one affluent area.

  2. Equity

    How a Booming City Can Be More Equitable

    In Durham, North Carolina, abandoned factories are becoming tech hubs and microbreweries. But building a shared commitment to its most vulnerable citizens could be a trickier feat of redevelopment.

  3. Equity

    What’s Wrong With HUD’s New Feel-Good Photoblog?

    The real-life portraits of housing-aid recipients assembled in ‘Humans of HUD’ reveal much about how the federal agency sees its mission.

  4. Slogan projected on the Eiffel Tower for World Climate Change Conference
    Environment

    What Local Climate Actions Would Have the Greatest Impact

    In light of even more dire news about our warming planet, leading thinkers tell us the one thing cities and states could do to cut emissions significantly—and fast.

  5. Aerial view of narrow strips of land divided by water, some with houses on them.
    Environment

    The Dutch Can’t Save Us From Rising Seas

    Dutch engineers are renowned for their ability to keep cities dry. But their approach doesn’t necessarily translate to an American context.