Ben Carson is pictured.
Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Back on: A federal judge is ordering HUD to implement a delayed Obama-era rule designed to break up concentrated pockets of poverty in a dozen cities—giving low-income people more access to affluent neighborhoods. The judge’s action follows a lobbying storm, The Washington Post reports:

A coalition of civil rights organizations sued the Trump administration in October after HUD Secretary Ben Carson announced that the agency would delay implementing the rule by nearly two years to allow the new administration time to fully understand its effects. Housing industry groups, including the National Association of Home Builders, lobbied against the rule, arguing that it would lead to disinvestment in inner city neighborhoods.

Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell … ruled on Dec. 23 that HUD’s decision to delay implementing the rule was “arbitrary and capricious.” She said the agency failed to show sufficient reason for a pause, and that a delay would irreparably harm the plaintiffs: a Hartford, Conn., mother of five and a Chicago mother trying to move their families to safer suburban communities.

The de Blasio paradox: Politico explores the contradictions of NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio—known for his progressive agenda but also for not following through with it—and never quite embraced on the national stage, even as rumors swirl of presidential ambitions.

Sanctuary enforcement: A group of 11 mostly Republican-led states is urging a federal appeals court to enforce President Trump’s order punishing sanctuary cities with funding cuts. (Bloomberg)

Airbnb crackdown: In the new year Amsterdam plans to slap fines on an estimated 6,000 Airbnb rentals that are allegedly violating local laws. (Quartz)

City bank: Portland is one of several U.S. cities exploring the concept of creating public, city-owned banks. (Next City)

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