Half a century later, what has America learned from it?

Editor’s note: It has been 50 years since the Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, commonly known as the Kerner Report, was first released. It contained hard truths about the inequality and brutality in American society that were at the root of many urban uprisings and riots. For CityLab’s look back at 1968, visual storyteller Ariel Aberg-Riger digs in to the history of the report and its legacy today.

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