Equity

The Future of the Middle Class Depends on Upgrading Service Jobs

More than 70 million Americans hold low-wage, precarious service jobs. We must make these jobs a pathway to the middle class.

Montreal Gets a 'Remarkable' Chance to Build a New Neighborhood

A historic brewery on the St. Lawrence River will become a new mixed-use district, with a large share of subsidized and below-market-rate housing.

A photo of a bike lane in Philadelphia

The Unsettling Rise of the Urban Narc App

It’s getting easier for city residents to use technology that can report bad drivers who block bike lanes. Welcome to the self-surveillance era of traffic safety.

The Next Recession Will Destroy Millennials

Millennials are already in debt and without savings. After the next downturn, they’ll be in even bigger trouble.

An old house beside a modern building with a sign reading "Brooklyn Cocktail Lounge"

Did a Brooklyn Home’s Tunnel Provide Passage to Escaped Slaves?

Underground Railroad participation is hard to prove. Activists battling to save 227 Duffield Street from demolition say its fate will show what New York values.

A rendering of a community room with a circle of chairs and people writing on a whiteboard.

Oakland’s Restorative-Justice Hub Wants to Redefine Public Safety

Restore Oakland provides a home for nonprofits that seek to resolve conflict, reduce incarceration, and empower low-income people.

Fishing boats, with high rises on the banks and a mosque in the distance.

Will Sea-Level Rise Claim Egypt’s Second-Largest City?

Al-Max village in Alexandria was ruined by floods in 2015. Yet, despite climate change’s growing threat to the city, critics say it has scarcely been addressed.

Police in a line; people sitting; a woman holding a photo of Castile.

A Black Minneapolis Artist Brings Hidden Communities to Light

Bobby Rogers’s art finds beauty and creativity in unseen communities, from black Muslims to Minneapolis gang members to faces of police brutality protesters.

An aerial photo of downtown Miami.

The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

A boy and three women carry flats of bottled water away from a municipal building.

Will Another U.S. City Emerge As the ‘Next Flint’?

It’s becoming clear that the problem of lead in Americans’ drinking water extends well beyond Flint.

A portrait of Jay-Z.

The Roots of Jay-Z’s ‘Black Capitalism’

Now partnering with the NFL, Jay-Z centers wealth-building in his activism, as many African Americans have before him—but without much success.

a photo of a group of homeless teens in Los Angeles.

Why There’s a Homelessness Crisis Among Transgender Teens

In California and other states, transgender and non-binary people are more likely to be unsheltered than any other unhoused population.

a photo of a tiny house in Oregon

How Amazon Could Transform the Tiny House Movement

Could the e-commerce giant help turn small-home living from a niche fad into a national housing solution?

What U.S. Cities Facing Climate Disaster Risks Are Least Prepared?

New studies find cities most vulnerable to climate change disasters—heat waves, flooding, rising seas, drought—are the least prepared.

a photo of Housing Secretary Ben Carson in Baltimore in July.

How HUD Could Dismantle a Pillar of Civil Rights Law

The Department of Housing and Urban Development plans to revise the “disparate impact” rule, which could fundamentally reshape federal fair housing enforcement.  

an illustration depicting a map of the Rio Grande river

Between Texas and Mexico, a Restless Border Defies the Map

In El Paso, we call it the Rio Grande; our neighbors in Juárez know it as Río Bravo. It’s supposed to be a national border, but the river had its own ideas.

a photo of a man pumping drinking water during the water shortage in Chennai, India.

The Future of the City is Thirsty

A new WRI report on 15 cities across the Global South reveals that access to safe drinking water is often underestimated—and the challenge will only get worse.

Children holding signs.

The Racism Behind Trump's New ‘Public Charge’ Immigration Policy, Explained

The changes to the “public charge” rule fit into a long history of attempting to restrict immigration based on race and ethnicity.

a photo of Tara Conley outside novelist Toni Morrison's birthplace in Lorain, Ohio, not far from Cleveland.

In Toni Morrison’s Hometown, the Familiar Has Become Foreign

The late novelist was born a few miles from me in Lorain, in a small-town Ohio she called “neither plantation nor ghetto.” But much has changed.

Asylum-seekers sit in Matamoros, Mexico, waiting to enter the U.S.

How Rule Changes About Public Benefits Could Affect Immigrants

The Trump administration announced changes to the “public charge” rule that will prevent immigrants who access government services from staying in the U.S.