Life

Giving an Underrepresented Community and City a Place in Literature

There There author Tommy Orange discusses his experience telling stories about Oakland and Native Americans, and why cities should be seen as part of the natural environment.

A judge in her robe sits at a desk facing two women whose backs are to the camera.

Judged in the Court of Public Support

Participants and graduation, instead of defendants and parole. Since April, Redmond, Washington’s, new community court has focused on assistance rather than punishment.

Life in East New York’s Sprawling Transit Hub

Much of Broadway Junction’s character derives from its impressive size, maze-like layout, relative isolation, and a design that contains little regard for conventional beauty.

British People Feel Locked Out of London

Britons who live outside the capital consider it too expensive and crowded for them to live there, a new report finds.

Like Uber, but for Cartographers

Streetcred, a blockchain-powered open-source mapping startup, will pay you to map. (And then give the data away for free.)

The Curse of America’s Illogical School-Day Schedule

It starts too early for teens’ sleep patterns, and ends too early for working parents. Does the country have to be stuck with it?

A large adventure playground with towers and slides.

A Short Guide to Tulsa’s New $465 Million Park

If Volcanoville and Charlie’s Water Mountain aren’t enough for you, what about a boating pond and a skate park?

A large tank truck parked in front of new apartment buildings.

The Divides Within, and Between, Urban and Rural America

Economic growth is not only uneven between urban and rural places—it is uneven within them, too.

Remembering the ‘Mother of All Pandemics,’ 100 Years Later

The Spanish flu outbreak of 1918 offers important lessons in balancing truth and panic during public health crises.

A mural on the side of a building shows a man standing in a city street.

The Polarizing Mayor Who Embodied ‘Blue-Collar Conservatism’

Frank Rizzo, Philadelphia’s mayor from 1972 to 1980, appealed to “law and order” and white working-class identity—a sign of politics to come, says the author of a new book.

What Worker Wouldn’t Move to Scandinavia in America?

Chasing an HQ2 is a dying model. As the nature of working changes, U.S. cities that provide workers with the support that companies once did, will prosper.

A Fifties-style diner with blue booths and chairs and pink walls.

Why a ‘Memory Town’ Is Coming to Your Local Strip Mall

Weeks after opening near San Diego, a model town for treating dementia is set to be replicated around the U.S.

A Bug’s Death

RIP Volkswagen Beetle, the car that conquered the city.

Jeff Bezos Talks Everything But HQ2

Amazon’s CEO wanted to talk about his new philanthropic initiatives at a high-profile dinner Thursday night. Attendees had other topics on their minds.

The Bodega Signmakers of New York

How these curbside canvases came to be, according to the men who make them.

A photo of the two mayors using ladles to pack lunches.

Don’t Overlook Equity Issues in City Climate-Action Plans

Cities that fail to make issues of equity and empowerment central to climate-action initiatives are not living up to the values of the movement, says a former mayor of Portland, Oregon.

Cynthia Nixon is pictured.

Why Cynthia Nixon Can't Have the Bagel She Wants

The unspoken rules of local food are a recurring nightmare for politicians.

Is This Experiment in Digital Democracy Too Crazy to Work?

A startup called Voatz wants to build an unhackable way to vote over the internet. What could possibly go wrong?

How ‘Social Infrastructure’ Can Knit America Together

Eric Klinenberg, author of Palaces for the People, talks about how schools, libraries, and other institutions can restore a sense of common purpose in America.

Homeless, But Part of Society in Montreal

Montreal has a multi-million dollar plan to address homelessness. At the center is social inclusion.