Life

An archived Geocities family homepage showing a green cottage against a background of fall leaves.

How Geocities Suburbanized the Internet

In the 1990s, AOL and Netscape got Americans onto the web, but it was Geocities—with its suburban-style “neighborhoods”—that made them feel at home.

When It’s Time to Sell the Family Home

Putting up a for-sale sign can mark a new stage in life for empty-nesters and their children alike.

The ‘Marie Kondo Effect’ Comes at a Weird Time for Thrift Stores

Netflix’s hit show has everyone tidying up, but that's not the only reason second-hand stores are being flooded with donations.

A slice of pepperoni pizza on a plate.

Remembering the Dining Fad of 'Pizza and Pipes'

In restaurants in Arizona, Illinois, and Wisconsin, the 1970s and ’80s craze for “pizza and pipes” lives on.

Former Toronto mayor Rob Ford at a political rally with a Canadian flag

Ford Nation: How Populism Took Hold in Toronto

Populism is usually seen as the outgrowth of left-behind places, but Rob and Doug Ford’s rise happened in diverse, progressive Toronto.

A heavily stamped passport with lighthouse icons

How Social Media Will Save Historic Lighthouses

While other attractions feel cursed by Instagram hordes, the United States Lighthouse Society is embracing social media.

Remembering Atlantic City’s Black History and Segregated Past

After the Great Migration, black residents in the Northside neighborhood duplicated businesses that excluded African Americans, creating a thriving environment.

A person hands cash to a vendor.

In Las Vegas, Kickbacks Sweeten the Deal for Uber and Lyft Drivers

For decades, Vegas night clubs have paid taxi drivers to bring in new customers. Now ride-sharing drivers find that a good hustle can pay off.

An fitness instructor leads a indoor running club.

The Rise and Fall of New Year’s Fitness Resolutions, in 5 Charts

The January gym spike is real, but it drops off just a few weeks later, according to data from location and fitness apps.

A man carrying a young boy on his shoulders amid the fall foliage of New York's Central Park.

Which U.S. Cities Have the Most Families With Kids?

Spoiler alert: It’s simply not the case that families with kids have disappeared from urban America.

The Fellowship of the Ring Finders

A website connects people who have misplaced their rings with metal detectorists who know where to look.

An artist's rendering of a proposed "human composting" facility, with skylights, plants, and benches.

Could ‘Human Composting’ Mean a Better, Greener Death?

As Washington State considers legalizing human composting, advocate Katrina Spade explains the process as a needed alternative to standard burial and cremation.

A photo of a Family Mart convenience store in Japan.

The Language Debate Inside Japan's Convenience Stores

Throughout Japan, store clerks and other service industry workers are trained to use the elaborate honorific speech called “manual keigo.” But change is coming.

L.A. Joins the Growing Battle Over Location Data

Los Angeles is taking the Weather Channel to court over its treatment of app users’ location data. Expect that to be one of many such lawsuits in 2019.

A car driving past a New Jersey location of LA Fitness.

The Geography of American Gym and Fitness-Center Brands

Gym and fitness-studio chains tend to specialize in either urban or suburban areas. But overall, they skew toward rich neighborhoods with lots of graduates, renters, and white people.

Carpenters frame a wall.

America’s Housing Crisis Could Imperil Trump’s Presidency

Many of the administration’s most famous policies are impediments to affordable construction.

Men in reflective vests carry trash away from a historic site in Philadelphia.

National Parks Get Some Volunteer Love During Government Shutdown

With National Park Service employees furloughed and trash mounting, cleaning up “helped me feel like I was doing as much as I could,” said one volunteer.

A photo of Clarence Eckerson, the director of Streetfilms, with a pre-fame Kate McKinnon in costume as Veronica Moss, auto industry lobbyist.

When Kate McKinnon Spoofed New York City’s War on Cars

Before Saturday Night Live, the comic starred in a series of shorts as an angry SUV lobbyist railing against the pedestrianization of Times Square.

How the Boston Molasses Disaster Ushered in the Era of Modern Regulation

100 years ago, a massive wave of molasses marked one of the strangest industrial disasters in modern history. It also marked a major moment in U.S. public policy.

What It’s Like to Be a Street Food Vendor in Mexico City

“Machos don’t like making tortillas, it’s usually only taught to women,” said Margarita Benitez, who has cooked up quesadillas and tlacoyos in the Juarez neighborhood for 40 years.

Women in a pilates class

Your Fitness Resolution Might Be Easier If You're Rich

The availability of exercise venues reflects broader divides of class and geography.